Type of Rash
Appearance
Associated Conditions
Maculopapular
Macules – flat erythematous areas of skin
Papules – raised erythematous areas of skin
Both will blanch under pressure
Rubella (only macules)
HHV6 / HHV7
Enterovirus
Scarlet fever
Kawasaki’s disease
DRUGS!
Purpuric / petechial
 
Non-blanching red/purple coloursed spots. Test them with a glass
Meningococcal
Enterovirus
Thrombocytopaenia
Vesicular
 
Raised, dome shaped lesions, <5mm diameter. Contain colourless fluid
Chickenpox
Shingles
Herpes Simplex
Hand, foot and mouth
Pustular / bullous
 
Raised, dome shaped lesions, >5mm diameter. Contain colourless fluid or pus
Impetigo
Scalded skin syndrome
Desquamation
Epidermal layer peels away. Most commonly found in the extremities.
After Scarlet fever
Kawasaki’s disease
After Measels
Neonates
Rash
Age
Info
Treatment
Image
Mongolian Blue Spot
Congenital
Common in Asian and Black children. Clinically significant as it may be mistaken for bruising. Typically occurs on the lower back.
Most disappear by age 5-6, and nearly all by puberty.
None. Present at birth and fades over time, although some adults may still have a visible rash
 
Erythema toxicum
2- 5 days
Very common – up to 50% of newborns, 2-5 days after birth. The cause is unknown. Appears a blotchy red patches on the skin, sometimes with papules and pustules
Usually resolves without treatment within a few days
 
Strawberry Naevus aka Strawberry Haemangioma
6-7 weeks old at presentation
Not present at birth, but develops during the first few weeks of life. A raised red lumpy spot, well demarcated. Can occur anywhere on the body, and grows for up to 18 months. After this time, will recede, and eventually disappear (usually by age 7). Can also occur in the trachea.
Usually none, but if around the eyes, or in the trachea may need to be removed. Can be done via laser or surgically, but they tend to bleed a lot! Can also try to reduce the size with topical steroids and propanolol.
 

 

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